Grants

Grant Resources

Suggest A Grant Resource

Financing and Grants

 

A grant is the primary source of funding for most schools that want to implement a technology program or enhance an existing one. The ability to make a compelling case for your school's need for a TV/Multimedia Studio Lab or for Editing Stations is essential.

Grant writing is one of the services we offer, and our experienced staff can help you secure the financing needed for the package that would best suit your school.

Sample Goal Statement

Technological literacy is essential in the global community. Video/Multimedia technology is an effective and highly visible means to help students achieve technological literacy. The student broadcast station described in this grant proposal provides instruction in every aspect of Video/Multimedia in proper sequence, allowing hands-on experience with state of the art equipment.

Working as a team, students must learn how to use the equipment, plan a broadcast, and solve the problems involved in creating a finished broadcast. In the process, students not only become proficient in operating equipment, but also acquire technological and social skills that enable them to create a finished product. The proposed video broadcast station is truly interdisciplinary in nature. It can and should encompass every class and department, school personnel, district and school board activities. Indeed, this is an integral link between the school and the community.

The primary goal of this proposal is to provide students with the opportunity to use broadcast production techniques as a means to learn technological skills they will need throughout their lives. According to the STEM publication “Skills for a New Century: A Blueprint for Lifelong Learning”, education and training programs must relate directly to skill needs, and lead to credentials that employers value.

These skills, such as those recommended by the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (STEM) and skill standards for specific jobs, include the following: basic skills, thinking skills, problem-solving skills, resource management, interpersonal skills, information analysis, understanding systems, and using new technologies.

Broadcast production falls within the communications area of technology studies. As such, it is in a unique position to meet the skills considered necessary by the STEM publication. Students learn the basic skills of using tools and equipment involved in Video/Multimedia. They go on to plan broadcasts, design storyboards, and solve problems as they come up. Students gain experience in managing equipment and personnel resources required for the broadcast.

As part of a team, students learn to do their part, and help others do theirs, and that all jobs are important to the finished product. During the editing phase, students must analyze the recorded information, and determine the best way to present it to the public in a fair, unbiased fashion. Students gain an understanding of a number of technological systems, including the camcorder and its operation, use of video editing equipment, and programming the Video/Multimedia equipment. Finally, broadcast technology is changing dramatically. The proposed broadcast station will expose students to cutting-edge technology with digital camcorders, non-linear editing systems, audio and video mixers, and programmable Video/Multimedia equipment.

A secondary goal is to give the school higher visibility within the community. These broadcasts serve as a means to promote school events, and they are an excellent public relations tool for the school. Using local cable access, the community has an increased awareness of school events and issues and a first-hand view of student efforts as they learn about video Video/Multimedia. By forming a partnership with the school, cable stations set the pace for other area businesses.

Expected Overall Results

Based on the experiences of other schools that have implemented a Video/Multimedia station, students who participate in this program will increase their knowledge of video Video/Multimedia as a medium and in terms of the equipment required. They will learn to plan broadcasts and allocate resources to make the broadcast possible. Unexpected events and glitches will give them valuable experience in problem solving.

Involvement in Video/Multimedia gives them an opportunity to determine how information is presented to the community, and teach them to evaluate information that they receive on television in their homes. Their experience with the school broadcast system will teach the students to use a methodical approach to using new technology, and give them a positive attitude toward it. Improved teamwork and interpersonal skills-- perhaps the most valued characteristic of employees in the workplace-- should be evident, as students must each work effectively in their own capacity while helping others do the same in order to produce a successful broadcast.

Target Population

The equipment and curriculum purchased through this grant will be available to all students who sign up for the class. It will be offered at beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels with the advanced veteran students helping the rookies.

Note: If it does not appear elsewhere in the proposal, information about demographics would be helpful here. This could include school enrollment, economic profile (number of students on free/ reduced lunches), and possibly racial profile of the school. How many students can the lab accommodate per year?

Objective 1

Upon completion of the School Broadcast Station Session Guides, all students will have a basic understanding of the elements of Video/Multimedia and will demonstrate the processes of broadcast production via their edited video, which will be a news program available to the school and community.

Evaluation

Before beginning the actual curriculum, students will take a pre-test to measure their knowledge of broadcast production. A quiz follows each session to reinforce the knowledge acquired during each process (formative evaluation). Upon completion of the course, students will take the post-test as a summery evaluation. A 90% improvement in knowledge and ability is expected. Tests will cover both elements of Video/Multimedia and equipment operation.

An edited video, which will be completed by each student, will illustrate the ability to effectively communicate a particular message to a targeted audience. Communication ability will be measured by designing a storyboard, writing and conducting an interview the continuity of the video.

Objective 2

Students will work as part of a team to solve the problems associated with creating a broadcast.

Evaluation

The instructor will observe and note positive and negative instances of teamwork. Evaluation will be based on students demonstrating whether they value their role and the role of others in the broadcast team. A weekly brainstorming session will be held to discuss these issues, and consider options for dealing with them. Each student will keep a portfolio showing the work they have done. This will include evidence that they have fulfilled their particular role as a broadcast team member. For example, the portfolio will contain storyboards created by the student, a journal of the student’s impressions of the each day’s work, scripts, interview notes, and a video copy of at least three completed broadcasts.

Objective 3

Students will apply their knowledge of video broadcast to other disciplines within the school.

Evaluation

Students will produce broadcast videos from at least three other areas within the school. These may include (but are not limited to) sports highlights, drama productions, speech and debate, ROTC activities, band concerts, science fairs, field trips, school board meetings, community projects, weekly news show, safety videos, and PTO meetings.

GRANT INFORMATION

  • http://www.Ksbe.state.ks.us Click on Education Initiatives, TAKE/E-Rate and Educational Resources for information on technology incentive programs, grants and funding.
  • http://www.dese.state.mo.us Grants that are available in Missouri are listed on this site. Among them are technology acquisition grants, technology enhancement grants, competitive grants, incentive grants, safe schools grants, school-to-work/school-to-career grants, A+ Schools Grants, and Community 2000 Grants.
  • http://www.mcrel.org/connect/tech/funding.html This web page provides a directory of funding opportunities, grant writing aids and strategies for schools interested in acquiring and establishing new technologies.
  • http://www.ospi.wednet.edu/grants.html A resource for students and teachers, the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction lists information on grants and funding for technology that can be found on the Internet.
  • http://discoveryschool.com/schrockguide/business/grants.html Six sites are listed with information on professional development opportunities, RETA '98 (project of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Department of Education), grant resources for Oregon teachers, Graphics, Exploiting Technology Grants and Refermation Reference Sites.
  • http://www.cfda.gov/ Federal programs that provide assistance in a wide variety of areas, including funding for technology assistance.
  • http://www.mindspring.com/~ajgrant/guide.htm A Grant Seeker's Guide to the Internet: Revised and Revisited: Ten page article that describes how to get connected to the Internet, necessary tools and links to grant sites.
  • http://www.ed.gov/Technology/challenge/ U. S. Department of Education Technology Innovation Challenge Grants: Promotes innovative uses of educational technology by awarding grants to partnerships of school districts, universities, businesses, libraries, software designers, and others.
  • http://www.ed.gov/funding.html U.S. Department of Education: Money Matters: State and Federal grant information (guidelines and regulations). Included is A+America Free Technology For Schools Home Page (http://www.aplusamerica.org/).

 

 


About Grant Writing

 

Gathering Information and Requesting a Grant Application

by Neva Fenno

Over the past several weeks, I have shared steps one through four to help you secure grant money for your school. Those first four steps include:

  1. Understanding the hurdle(s)/issue(s) your school faces.
  2. Developing a solution to address those issues.
  3. Finding all possible grants to fund your solution.
  4. Matching your needs with likely grant sources.

Step five is obtaining the actual grant applications for your top one or two grant matches and gathering all the information you need to complete those applications.

First and foremost, you need to understand a grantor’s application process and obtain an application form far enough in advance of the deadline so you are not rushed when it comes time to fill it out. If you plan ahead, you are much more likely to submit a competitive grant application.

You should be aware that different organizations use different types of grant applications. Quite a few foundations require no more than a letter that explains your school's problem, your planned solution, and a budget that details the money you need. That letter takes the place of a formal application. In other cases, some groups of foundations use common grant applications. But most foundations, states and federal agencies use unique, detailed applications for each grant they sponsor. Grant seekers must obtain the specific application required to apply for each grant.

The type of application required for each grant you seek is typically listed on the grantor’s website. In many cases, you will find, complete, and submit your application without ever leaving the grantor’s site. More often, however, grantors provide applications you can download to your computer and print out at your convenience.

Finally, some grantors require you to submit a request for an application in writing. If the grantor has a website, an email usually meets this requirement, and the application will be mailed or emailed to you. If the grantor does not have a website, both the request for an application and the return of the application will be accomplished using regular mail.

It's important to know all the details of the application process up front so you can plan your time well and not be rushed.

Once you obtain the application, read it thoroughly -- several times. Concentrate on the different kinds of information you will need in order to complete the application. Although quite a bit of the application will require you to supply information in narrative form, you will likely need statistics from several sources to verify your need for help. You will also have to develop a budget for your project.

Before you actually begin completing an application, gather all the reference materials and statistical information you will likely need and find a quiet place to work. You don't want to interrupt your writing every 15 minutes to look for some vital piece of information that you should have at your fingertips. You should also schedule sufficient time so you can complete the application without interruption. Your writing should flow, and it will only do so if you’ve gathered all the tools and information before you sit down to write.

You will be two steps ahead of your competition if you have carefully read the application and gathered all the materials you will need to complete it without interruption. Good planning is a vital part of the grant application process.

 


Grant Resources

 

The following links offer connections to organizations that assist with educational grants:

 

THE GRANTS CENTER

Dreyfus Foundation Educational Grants from The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Giving on a national basis to support museums, cultural, and performing arts programs; schools, hospitals, educational and skills training programs, programs for youth, seniors, and the handicapped; environmental and wildlife protection activities; and other community-based organizations and their programs. Organizations seeking support from the Foundation may submit a letter of request, not exceeding three pages in length, which includes a brief description of the purpose of the organization, and a brief outline of the program or project for which funding is sought.

States:
All States

Total Amount:
$2,800,000.00 - $4,000,000.00

Average Amount:
$1,000.00 - $20,000.00

Address:
2233 Wisconsin Avenue N.W., Suite 414, Washington, DC 20007

Telephone:
202-337-3300

E-mail:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website:
Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation

Eligibility:
Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas:
After School, Arts, At-Risk/Character, Disabilities, General Education, Health/PE, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM ( Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)

Deadline:
11/10/2013

===============================================================

Classroom Grants the Association of American Educators Classroom grants can be used for a variety of projects and materials, including but not limited to books, software, calculators, math manipulatives, art supplies, audio-visual equipment, and lab materials. Classroom grants are available to all educators.

States:
All States

Average Amount:
$500.00

Address:
27405 Puerta Real, Suite 230, Mission Viejo, California 92691

Telephone:
877-385-6264

E-mail
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website:
Association of American Educators

Eligibility:
Public School, Private School

Program Areas:
Arts, General Education, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Technology

Deadline:
3/1/2014

===============================================================

Siemens PLM Software Grant from the SME Education Foundation Siemens & SME Education Foundation support the academic community and want to offer all schools the opportunity to use the latest, state-of-the-art PLM tools in their curriculum. Grants are available for academic licenses of Siemens PLM software, including NX, Velocity Series, Tecnomatix, Teamcenter, Parasolid, Fibersim, Seat Design Environment and Syncrofit. Academic institutions will have access to the following: Unlimited seats of academic software bundles, free center-based training, discounted online learning, academic resource center, and free upgrades and tech support.

States:
All States

Address:
One SME Drive, P.O. Box 930, Dearborn, MI 48121-0930

Telephone:
313-425-3300

E-mail:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website
SME Education Foundation

Eligibility:
Public School

Program Areas:
Facilities Maintenance, Professional Development, Technology

Deadline:
Ongoing

===============================================================

Smart from the Start Awards from Together Counts Together Counts “Smart from the Start” Contest provides teachers an opportunity to win cash to be used to improve the school’s Pre-K program and a selection of books appropriate to the Pre-K curriculum. Entrants must develop an action plan identifying a need, write a goal statement, do background research, develop an action plan, explain how the plan will be implemented and how its success will be measured, and describe how the Entrant would use the prize to create long-term improvements for balancing nutrition and physical activity within their school community, if selected as a winner.

States:
All States

Average Amount:
$2,500.00 - $20,000.00

E-mail:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website:
Together Counts

Eligibility:
Public School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas:
Early Childhood, Health/PE

Deadline:
2/28/2014

*******************************

  • Additional Grant Resources

Department of Education/Funding
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Domestic Assistance
Federal Money Retriever
Foundation Center
Grants.gov
Scholastic
Students with Disabilities Grants
US Dept of Health and Human Services

 

 

Funding for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) subject areas have been identified as areas with a global skills shortage. As a result, governments, societies and industrial organizations around the world are allocating extra funding for STEM resources at schools and colleges.

US Government Funding


The US Department of Education is allocating to STEM education. This is distributed to Local Education Authorities and made available as competitive grants to individual schools and colleges. As part of the scheme, the goverment authorized the Secretary of Education to award grants of $50,000 to three elementary and three secondary schools, with a high concentration of low-income students in each state, whose students demonstrate the largest improvement in mathematics and science.

National Space Grant Foundation
The National Space Grant Foundation is a tax exempt organization set up to support STEM education (at various levels) connected to space, aeronautics, aviation and Earth System science. Grants are available to every American State. Other STEM projects are also funding by NASA.

The Lockheed Martin Corporation
The Lockheed Martin Corporation awards grants for tax-exempt non-profit public elementary and secondary schools in the United States for STEM programs. In 2009, Lockheed Martin dedicated more than $24 million to programs supporting STEM education, community service, and military support.

Lockheed Martin Corporation
6801 Rockledge Drive
Bethesda, MD 20817
301-897-6000 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting
301-897-6000
lockheedmartin.com

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)
The Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) awards more than $1.4 million annually in scholarships and grants for educational programs in science and technology. Grants for $1,000 are awarded to STEM teachers and can be used to purchase lab supplies, software, hardware or other equipment that enhance the STEM curriculum. Funds may also be used for after-school activities such as math clubs and robotic competitions. Teachers must apply for grants through their local AFCEA chapters.

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association
4400 Fair Lakes Court
Fairfax, VA 22033-3899
afcea.org

 

The STEM Education Coalition

 

The STEM Education Coalition is composed of a large group of industrial organizations that implement STEM skills within their workforce and education professionals.

Adopt-A-Classroom Grant
Alfred P Sloan Education Grant
Allstate Foundation
AMD Corporate Contributions Grants
American Express Foundation Grants
AOL Time Warner Initiatives
Arthur Vining Davis Education Grant
Bank of America Foundation Grants
Boeing Company Charitable Contributions Program
Box Tops for Education

Broad Foundation Grants
Charles Lafitte Foundation
ChevronTexaco Teacher/Classroom Grant Program
Coca-Cola Foundation Grants
Computers for Learning
Corning Foundation Grants
CyberLearning Matching Grants
Educational Foundation of America
Edward W. Hazen Foundation Grants
Ford Motor Company Fund Grants
GAERF Mini-Grants
General Mills Foundation Education Grant
Hewlett-Packard U.S. Grants Program

Hitachi Foundation Education Grant
Intel Community Grants

Internet Technology Grants
Kellogg Foundation Grants
Lowe's Foundation Grants
Mazda Foundation Education Grant
Merrill Lynch Foundation Grants
Microsoft's Unlimited Potential Initiative Program
Milagro Foundation Grant
Motorola Foundation Education Grant
Mott Foundation Education Grant
National Science Foundation Programs
NFIE Leadership Grant
Pentair Foundation Grant
RGK Foundation Grants
Rockefeller Brothers Education Fund
Staples Recycle for Education
State Farm Foundation
Tellabs Foundation Grants
Tiger Woods Foundation
Toshiba America Foundation Grants


7 Ways To Get Funding

 

Nutmeg Education

 

(This article is copied from the website: Nutmeg Education)

 



7 Ways To Get Funding And Grants For Technology In Your Classroom

July 29, 2013

As past educators, we know how tedious it can be to search and apply for grants and funding for your classroom. Fortunately, there are a bunch of ways to get gadgets into your classroom with out actually taking money out of your own pocket. We decided to make it a little bit easier by showing you some opportunities that you can take advantage of. Here are 7 ways to receive funding for technology in your classroom!

 

1. Technology Donors Program – Technology Donors Program matches teachers with prospective donors. In order to participate, teachers compile a wish list of technology devices they want for their classroom and add them to their “classroom profile” which also consists of classroom stories and experiences. Donors can then search through the various profiles and choose to either donate funding or purchase an item from the wish list for the teacher. After each time a donor purchases an item for a school, Digital Wish gives the that particular school 2-10% cash back as aid for their next technology project. Deadline is ongoing.

Website: http://www.digitalwish.com/dw/digitalwish/teachers

2. Donors Choose – Teachers post what they need in particular for classroom projects on the website. A donor can choose to help fund the project and when the project reaches it’s goal, the website send the materials directly to the school. The program supports K-12 classrooms, and public charter schools, in all 50 states across America.

Website: www.Donorschoose.org

3. Computers For Learning – Computers For Learning gives classrooms computers and facilitates the transferring of computers from government agencies and the private sector to schools and educational nonprofits. In order to be eligible to receive computers, a school must be a k-12 public, private, homeschool, or parochial school. Deadline is rolling.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://computersforlearning.gov/

4. Computers Recycling Center (Computers and Education) – The CRC collects used computer equipment and reuses and refurbishes them. They then send the computers to Computers and Education so the program can give them to teachers, schools, community programs, foster kids, and disabled elderly through city and county agencies. The CRC has kept over 100,000 tech items out of landfills.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.crc.org/

5. Digital Wish Grants – (Source – Tool Factory and Olympus) Digital Wish Grants aims to help teachers receive funding for technology in their classroom. Through this program, teachers that submit a lesson plan are automatically eligible to be entered to win up to 50 technology grants. Participating teachers can share classroom stories and experiences and Digital Wish Grants will add them to the website. This allows potential donors to make a contribution. Deadline is rolling.

Website: http://www.digitalwish.com/dw/digitalwish/grants

6. Corning Incorporated Foundation – The foundation supports grants for instructional technology for the classroom among a variety of other grants. Currently, the foundation gives 136 grants in education totaling about $3 million.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.corningincfoundation.org/guidelines/

7. Funding Factory – (Source – Environmental Reclamation Services, LLC) Funding Factory is a free fundraising program for schools, nonprofits, and charities that encourages the donation of empty printer cartridges, cell phones, and various other electronic devices. Once these items are recycled, the organization earns points. The points can be exchanged for new technology (that can be used in school) or cash. The deadline is ongoing.

Website: http://www.fundingfactory.com/

 

Here are other sites and opportunities to search for grants and funding for your classroom. These sites have a wealth of grant information and updates:

  • Grants.gov – This site gives the opportunity to search and apply for federal grants. On the website, the teacher can search for technology grants by plugging in a key word or clicking on the category.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.grants.gov/search/basic.do

  • MultiMedia & Internet@Schools - This is a magazine that looks at the different technologies used in K-12 schools. The website includes a grants section.

Publisher: Information Today

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • The Foundation Center – The website provides the opportunity to search for funders in a particular area.

Website: http://foundationcenter.org/

  • eSchool News online – This is an online monthly newspaper that contains an updated grants section.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.eschoolnews.com/funding/

  • Grants Watch – Website posts federal, state, city, local, and foundation grants on one website. The grants are categorized by type (i.e. teacher grants).

Website: http://www.grantwatch.com/


Nutmeg Education

 

(This article is copied from the website: Nutmeg Education)

 



7 Ways To Get Funding And Grants For Technology In Your Classroom

July 29, 2013

As past educators, we know how tedious it can be to search and apply for grants and funding for your classroom. Fortunately, there are a bunch of ways to get gadgets into your classroom with out actually taking money out of your own pocket. We decided to make it a little bit easier by showing you some opportunities that you can take advantage of. Here are 7 ways to receive funding for technology in your classroom!

 

1. Technology Donors Program – Technology Donors Program matches teachers with prospective donors. In order to participate, teachers compile a wish list of technology devices they want for their classroom and add them to their “classroom profile” which also consists of classroom stories and experiences. Donors can then search through the various profiles and choose to either donate funding or purchase an item from the wish list for the teacher. After each time a donor purchases an item for a school, Digital Wish gives the that particular school 2-10% cash back as aid for their next technology project. Deadline is ongoing.

Website: http://www.digitalwish.com/dw/digitalwish/teachers

2. Donors Choose – Teachers post what they need in particular for classroom projects on the website. A donor can choose to help fund the project and when the project reaches it’s goal, the website send the materials directly to the school. The program supports K-12 classrooms, and public charter schools, in all 50 states across America.

Website: www.Donorschoose.org

3. Computers For Learning – Computers For Learning gives classrooms computers and facilitates the transferring of computers from government agencies and the private sector to schools and educational nonprofits. In order to be eligible to receive computers, a school must be a k-12 public, private, homeschool, or parochial school. Deadline is rolling.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://computersforlearning.gov/

4. Computers Recycling Center (Computers and Education) – The CRC collects used computer equipment and reuses and refurbishes them. They then send the computers to Computers and Education so the program can give them to teachers, schools, community programs, foster kids, and disabled elderly through city and county agencies. The CRC has kept over 100,000 tech items out of landfills.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.crc.org/

5. Digital Wish Grants – (Source – Tool Factory and Olympus) Digital Wish Grants aims to help teachers receive funding for technology in their classroom. Through this program, teachers that submit a lesson plan are automatically eligible to be entered to win up to 50 technology grants. Participating teachers can share classroom stories and experiences and Digital Wish Grants will add them to the website. This allows potential donors to make a contribution. Deadline is rolling.

Website: http://www.digitalwish.com/dw/digitalwish/grants

6. Corning Incorporated Foundation – The foundation supports grants for instructional technology for the classroom among a variety of other grants. Currently, the foundation gives 136 grants in education totaling about $3 million.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.corningincfoundation.org/guidelines/

7. Funding Factory – (Source – Environmental Reclamation Services, LLC) Funding Factory is a free fundraising program for schools, nonprofits, and charities that encourages the donation of empty printer cartridges, cell phones, and various other electronic devices. Once these items are recycled, the organization earns points. The points can be exchanged for new technology (that can be used in school) or cash. The deadline is ongoing.

Website: http://www.fundingfactory.com/

 

Here are other sites and opportunities to search for grants and funding for your classroom. These sites have a wealth of grant information and updates:

  • Grants.gov – This site gives the opportunity to search and apply for federal grants. On the website, the teacher can search for technology grants by plugging in a key word or clicking on the category.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.grants.gov/search/basic.do

  • MultiMedia & Internet@Schools - This is a magazine that looks at the different technologies used in K-12 schools. The website includes a grants section.

Publisher: Information Today

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • The Foundation Center – The website provides the opportunity to search for funders in a particular area.

Website: http://foundationcenter.org/

  • eSchool News online – This is an online monthly newspaper that contains an updated grants section.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.eschoolnews.com/funding/

  • Grants Watch – Website posts federal, state, city, local, and foundation grants on one website. The grants are categorized by type (i.e. teacher grants).

Website: http://www.grantwatch.com/