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eBook

How to Teach Multimedia
without having a Dumb Attack

Video Chuck
 
Download Free Sample eBook
 

Necessary read for: Instructors k-12, Churches,
Home Schoolers & Self employed.


 
The only book you'll need to learn how to teach multmedia/video.

Purchase Price $14.95!
How to Teach Multimedia

Practical information on classroom and studio structure, equipment, software, classroom management, outcomes and objectives, grading, grant-writing, creating student projects like morning announcements and classroom & school orientation, and sales videos.

Keep your students on task instead of just playing with equipment.

Valuable for experienced teachers and novices, company presidents and employees!

 

On-line Book by Video Chuck Proves Invaluable for Multimedia Teachers

Overland Park, KS, October 16, 2015. Chuck Dolbeare, aka Video Chuck, President of Teach Multimedia, comes to the rescue of school multimedia instructors by providing a classroom roadmap in his new book, "How to Teach Multimedia Without Having a Dumb Attack."   

Chuck Dolbeare, aka Video Chuck, President of Teach Multimedia, comes to the rescue of school multimedia instructors by providing a classroom roadmap in his new book, "How to Teach Multimedia Without Having a Dumb Attack."

Based on years of experience in both video/multimedia and education, Dolbeare has put together a practical, easy to follow plan for teaching multimedia/video production to K-12 students - or even to company employees hoping to produce their own product presentation. Every aspect of multimedia education is covered, from ordering equipment and setting up the classroom to completing a video project with scripts, interviews, editing and special effects. Both experienced teachers and novices will benefit.

Familiarity with complicated video cameras and employment at a TV station does not equal teaching expertise. Video Chuck recounts his own days of producing and directing a national TV show, editing at NBC and video production for famous personalities. In his mind back then, all of that qualified him to teach kids how to be a CNN personality. He calls this attitude his "Dumb Attack." When transitioning to educational multimedia, he realized that very few multimedia graduates went to work in a high profile market, but a whole lot of them were employed in corporations, businesses or as entrepreneurs. A smart new approach was needed, as opposed to the "dumbness" of teaching kids to operate sophisticated equipment with the goal of going to a big city broadcast station.

Been assigned to teach such a class when you least expected it? This book is a must read. Since this industry is a permanent fixture in the global economy and changes on nearly a daily basis, Dolbeare knew that teachers needed to know production basics that stay constant regardless of the latest technology. Software and hardware come and go, but storyboard planning, proper camera angles and editing techniques are involved in every production.

Because multimedia is a wildly popular elective, most classes are large which means teachers often go a little crazy trying to keep everyone on task. Avoiding chaos through effective classroom management is one of the key factors to success. This is dealt with extensively as there are so many parts and pieces involved in multimedia technology. Following the methods and techniques in Video Chuck's guide has been a lifeline to countless teachers who have learned them at Dolbeare's in-service workshops. Testimonies of some of these instructors appear in the pages of the book.

Imagine your school is putting together a multimedia program, and you're in charge. This "don't have a Dumb Attack" book will direct you through planning, budgeting, purchasing student-friendly equipment, arranging the classroom, type of curriculum to use, how to produce a video project from the storyboard to the final edit and all the paper work that goes with all of this. This strategy will lead to a successful program and will make your life a whole lot easier. Dolbeare's motivation is to educate and provide resources for multimedia instructors and to motivate students to consider this exciting technology as a possible career path.